22-24 year-olds – most frequent pub-goers in Scotland

Younger customers in their mid-20s and those aged between 24-44 are the most frequent visitors to pubs with a quarter (24 per cent) visiting at least once a fortnight.
Younger customers in their mid-20s and those aged between 24-44 are the most frequent visitors to pubs with a quarter (24 per cent) visiting at least once a fortnight.

Research commissioned by Molson Coors in Scotland found that younger customers in their mid-20s and those aged between 24-44 are the most frequent visitors to pubs with a quarter (24 per cent) visiting at least once a fortnight.

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Off-trade

12 October 2012 | 0

Despite that, some 76 per cent of respondents to this survey believe that the pattern of pub closures in Scotland looks set to continue.

Sine 2007 over 700 pubs have closed down in Scotland states the report Local Pub: Local Hub?.

Molson Coors argues in the report that pubs can act as ‘local stand-ins’ for communal amenities as social clubs and community centres disappear.

After all, some 32 per cent of people visit their local at least twice a month while 41 per cent of males believe it’s important to have a pub within walking distance of their home. But the recession has led to people having less disposable income and the on-trade in Scotland is suffering.

Another interesting finding: more than half of all women in Scotland now visit the pub.

“From the cosy pubs at the heart of rural communities to the bigger venues in our towns and cities that serve thousands of people every month, pubs are an important part of Scottish life,” agreed Scotland’s Justice Cabinet Secretary Kenny MacAskill, “For hundreds of years, people have used them to enjoy a drink and a chat with their friends and we all want to see that continue.”

He will consider the report’s findings and would encourage everyone to “recognise the value of their local pubs, restaurants and hotels which are important parts of our communities”.

A core emphasis on ensuring higher quality customer care was deemed the primary reason that local pubs in Scotland have managed to sustain their business and ensure customers are not lost to potentially cheaper but less welcoming premises.

The Managing Director of Molson Coors Scotland Phil Whitehead concluded, “It’s very promising to see pubs innovating and demonstrating resilience in the face of the challenges they face. Actively seeking to attract a wider audience and remaining committed to prioritising service above all else is cementing the key role that pubs continue to play in society. It is this steadfast determination to respond to customer needs and adapt their business accordingly which is helping sustain the trade, despite tough times”.

 



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