‘Buy Irish’ message is working

ShelfLife study reveals consumers look for Irish products

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30 August 2013

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The vast majority of Irish consumers (80%) say the presence of symbols such as Love Irish Food and Guaranteed Irish on grocery items, has encouraged them to purchase more Irish goods. This has risen from 72% of shoppers the previous year. In further good news for Irish suppliers, last year nearly 72% of shoppers said they buy Irish products in order to protect Irish jobs.

Demonstrating that the benefits of buying Irish have now become even more widespread, the most recent results show this has now increased to 76% of consumers.

The research which was conducted by Field Management Ireland (FMI) for ShelfLife magazine in association with SuperValu and Bord Bia, surveyed 300 consumers and 100 retailers across the Republic of Ireland during July 2013. Commenting on the results, FMI chief operating officer Nicola De Beer said: "I think the results are great in comparison. If you compare them against last year’s, there’s definitely been an upward trend and people want to buy Irish which is brilliant. The research has shown that people are buying Irish because they feel that it’s securing Irish jobs, which is a promising trend. This is definitely a move in the right direction."

ShelfLife acting editor Gillian Hamill said: "The results clearly demonstrate that price is not the sole concern when consumers are choosing own-brand grocery items, with over three-quarters of shoppers (76%) describing the Irish origin of such ranges as ‘very important’. However only 48% of consumers believe the Irish origins of own-brand products are clearly communicated on-pack, suggesting there is some room for improvement within this area."

The Irish Examiner has covered the survey results and a more detailed report of the research will be published in the September edition of ShelfLife magazine.

 

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