Alcohol Bill: advertising restrictions set for next year

Health minister Simon Harris has begun the process of implementing the Alcohol Bill
Health minister Simon Harris has begun the process of implementing the Alcohol Bill

Following the eventual passing of the Alcohol Bill last month, details are now starting to come along surrounding the specifics of the advertising restrictions contained therein, which were rather vague throughout the entire consultation process.

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6 November 2018 | 0

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Drinks companies will have a year to get their ducks in a row with regard to alcohol advertising under restrictions contained in the recently-passed Alcohol Bill. From November 2019, alcohol advertising will be banned within 200m of schools, creches or public authority playgrounds, while cinema advertising will also be restricted depending on the age rating of the film in question.

Furthermore, heavy restrictions will come into effect in and around public transport vehicles, including at train stations and bus stops, while clothing manufacturers will be prohibited from advertising on children’s clothing (i.e. sports jerseys).

These details and more were confirmed when health minister Simon Harris signed the order to commence the Bill’s measurements. Structural separation and health warning labels on alcohol products will see a lead-in time of up to three years, with many more measures also included in the Bill. However, one of the most controversial elements of the Bill, the cancer warning labels, is still subject to approval by the European Commission, which must decide if such labels would be a barrier to trade.

“We know that we have a relationship with alcohol in this country that is not good, damages our health, harms our communities and harms many families,” Harris said. “The measures in this Bill will make a real difference to changing the culture of drinking in Ireland over a period of time.”

 

 

 

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